A Simple Proposition

This morning the debate over the NSA’s PRISM program is all over the internet and news. It has entered the general national conversation as we debate privacy in the age of data mining and the monetization of information obtained from internet users, cell phones, and other communications media.

At the same time, the issue of government overreach and deception is being investigated in the Fast & Furious, Benghazi, AP/Rosen, and IRS scandals.

Trust in government is plummeting as a result. It would seem that the concerns of the Tea Party and Occupy movements are dovetailing into perhaps the greatest fear of our own government and its intentions in our history.

We are being told by the most secretive President in our history “trust me” just as his administration has displayed reckless abandon with the law.

And we now find that the use of the PRISM program was expanded even further than originally intended with no public scrutiny.

The NSA and other organizations such as Google use huge screening tools to scour the various nets for keywords such as “bomb” or “allahu akhbar” (in any language of one’s choosing) or “secret Bat plan”. These key word searches amass incredible amounts of data which is almost impossible to process in real time.  The exception is of course active programs such as specific searches on specific organizations or individuals.

Most of the data ends up in a huge data dump somewhere. However, there is the question of why it is being collected in the first place.

So, perhaps we can collectively send the data miners a message. I would propose that at 1:00PM Eastern Daylight Time on Friday, anyone who reads this to e mail or text a message using what you think would be a probable code word. It doesn’t even have to be at that time.

During World War II and even today, airplanes eject “chaff” to confuse enemy radar and targeting systems. Why not use digital chaff?

Because even the NSA and GCHQ in England don’t have the storage space for billions upon billions of messages should enough people participate. Pass the word. If they want to analyze our data try analyzing this.

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4 thoughts on “A Simple Proposition

  1. On pages 20-23 of the Analyst-Desktop-Binder-REDACTED: https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/296596/analyst-desktop-binder-redacted.pdf you can find a list of all of the key words used.

    This article in the 26 May 2012 UK Daily Mail provides some background:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2150281/REVEALED-Hundreds-words-avoid-using-online-dont-want-government-spying-you.html

    I’d also like to MOST STRONGLY recommend two article by Richard Fernandez, both from 11 June 2013:

    The Attack of the Golem: http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2013/06/11/the-attack-of-the-golem/
    The Destroyer of Words: http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/06/11/the-destroyer-of-words/

  2. On pages 20-23 of the Analyst-Desktop-Binder-REDACTED: https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/296596/analyst-desktop-binder-redacted.pdf one can find a list of all of the key words used.

    This article in the 26 May 2012 UK Daily Mail provides some background:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2150281/REVEALED-Hundreds-words-avoid-using-online-dont-want-government-spying-you.html

    I’d also like to MOST STRONGLY recommend two article by Richard Fernandez, both from 11 June 2013:

    The Attack of the Golem: http://pjmedia.com/richardfernandez/2013/06/11/the-attack-of-the-golem/
    The Destroyer of Words: http://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/06/11/the-destroyer-of-words/

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